Before Tools of the Trade was published in digital form, we reported on a company called RAPTOR, which held the original patents on composite staplers and nailers, and composite fasteners. According to RAPTOR, it has been selling composite nails and nailers all over the world since 1993. RAPTOR’s original patent expired a couple of years ago. Now, Senco has developed its own version of the composite staplers and nailers, which it expects to release in late February.

Here's a look at the SPS20XP-12, SPS16XP-11, and the SPS16XP-12 display at STAFDA 2016 in Atlanta. These nailers might look like your typical pneumatic nailer, but they only shoot composite fastners thanks to a shorter drive pin than is found in conventional nailers.
Chris Ermides Here's a look at the SPS20XP-12, SPS16XP-11, and the SPS16XP-12 display at STAFDA 2016 in Atlanta. These nailers might look like your typical pneumatic nailer, but they only shoot composite fastners thanks to a shorter drive pin than is found in conventional nailers.

This new line of Senco fasteners are designed to specifically be used with a new line of air nailers. (What… did you think you would be able to use your existing air gun? Not a chance; it will cause damage to even try it.) The drive pins on the new tools are made shorter than normal; this will allow the fastener to protrude past the surface, then it can be sanded and milled. The exposed composite fastener can be stained, painted, and blended into the final product. The other difference is that this time, shorter is better. As a general rule, a 3/8” penetration into your substrate is all you need to achieve maximum holding power, although there are some exceptions.

The important thing to remember when using composite fasteners is that it is a method of temporary holding power until your chosen adhesive dries. These fasteners actually have twice the holding power, however ½ the shear value as compared to similar sized steel fasteners. You cannot use these fasteners on load bearing applications as they will snap.

Will steel and metal fasteners become a thing of the past? Probably not, but this is a game changer for sure. A fastener made with a blend of polymer resin and fiberglass will allow the user to use fasteners where steel fasteners cannot or should not be used.

For instance:


Woodworking
Composite nails and staples will provide a temporary hold until your adhesive cures. The new fastener can be sanded, shaped, and cut, all without wear to your sanding belts and tooling!
CNC fixturing
For me personally, I have hit my share of fasteners on the CNC, when this happens, the expensive router bit is trashed. With composite fasteners you will now have the ability to secure your piece to the spoilboard and not worry at all if the bit runs through it.
PVC fabrication
Another fantastic use is in cellular PVC products. Simply apply your adhesive of choice, secure the pieces together with a white fastener in the white PVC, hit it with the sander, and your done! No Filler needed!
Lumber Tagging
I am no lumber jack, but I have been hit a time or two with flying staples from tagged lumber. Hey, we can’t see everything before it gets milled!

There will be five pneumatic nailers available:
1. SPFN15XP - 15 Gauge finish nailer that will shoot nails ½” to 1 ½” long
2. SPBN18XP - 18 Gauge brad nailer that will shoot nails 7/16” to 1” long
3. SPS16XP-11 – 16 Gauge 7/16” crown stapler that will shoot staples 7/16” to 9/16” long
4. SPS16XP-12 – 16 Gauge ½” crown stapler that will shoot 3/8” staples
5. SPS20XP-12 – 20 Gauge ½” crown stapler that will shoot staples ¼” to 9/16” long