More stories about Profile

  • Driving the Brand: Ken Hefley

    Whether he's working in his woodshop, renovating his house, or riding dirt bikes in the desert, Ken Hefley brings a high-octane blend of craft, passion, and competitiveness to everything he does. His job as Makita USA's senior VP of marketing is no exception. 'I've competed in sports all my life,'...

  • Randall Coe, VP of Marketing, Bosch Power Tools

    If you look beyond Randall Coe's titles at Bosch, first as director of product development and now as vice president of marketing, you'll find a complex, energetic ToolHound. Coe's leadership and rebellious streak have produced paradigm-shifting tools–stuff you use every day–and a business culture...

  • Cutting Edge: "The Old Saw Man"

    Tools of the Trade magazine presented its first Lifetime Achievement Award to living legend Marshall Burns at the JLC Live Show in Providence, R.I., in March. Burns started working with his father in 1937 making saw blades, often traveling to remote sawmills in the Maine woods to set up the...

  • Chris Holmgren, Dickerson, Md.

    The U.S. Forest Service says 3.8 billion board feet of good timber–felled from storms, construction, disease, or every-day tree removal–is trashed each year. That really bothered Chris Holmgren. The proprietor of Seneca Creek Joinery in Dickerson, Md., about 30 miles north of Washington, D.C....

  • Born To Build: Don Dunkley, Cool, Calif.

    Don Dunkley's ToolHound-ness was cast in Southern California tract framing in the 1970s. Ace framers made more money than doctors, and were driven by the relentless pursuit of production based on minimum tools–and maximum skill. Not even nails were spared.

  • Toolbelt Diva: Norma Vally

    Some girls like dolls, others like ponies. Norma Vally liked tools. The Brooklyn native remembers helping her father with fix-it projects as a very young girl, 'whatever age a kid can hold a tool,' she says, which turns out to be a great background, given her current status as the 'Toolbelt Diva'...

  • Roy Underhill, Williamsburg, Va.

    Roy Underhill is the one and only Woodwright, a term he coined to help sell his show idea to public television in the late 1970s. Now in its 28th season of filming, the original how-to show, 'The Woodwright's Shop,' is still going strong. In fact, Underhill is one of the longest-running program...

  • Tim Kenney: 'Gazinta Man'

    The look in Tim Kenney's eyes when he's showing you his shop says it all: 'I was born for this job.' And it didn't take him long as a kid to know this self-truth. 'When the other kids were playing sports, I was in my basement scavenging model airplane engines and making rockets,' he says.

  • Super Cooper

    Walk into Norm Pederson's cooper shop, and you'll feel like you've stepped back into the 1850s. Lit by daylight and heated by a woodstove, this mid-19th century building is part of Historic Richmond Town on New York's Staten Island. When not working as one of the island's ferrymen, it is here that...

  • Rock Star

    Josh Wiener carves a living out of stone–literally. As a second-generation sculptor, he works mainly in marble but also is well-versed in granite and limestone, and even does artistic concrete creations. After developing his talent close to home, Wiener went on to apprenticeships in Japan and...