More stories about Jet

  • Cutting Edge: Tool Crib Founder Returns to the Web

    Acme Tools, the Midwest retail powerhouse that created the original online tool and construction equipment sales site, Tool Crib of the North, has re-entered Internet retailing after a 10-year hiatus. Tool Crib was sold to Amazon.com in 1999.

  • Tool Test: Six-Inch Jointers

    Jointers are the go-to tools for straightening and squaring lumber, and standard-length 6-inch-wide capacity models are a great choice for most carpentry and trim uses in the shop and on the job site. These 46-inch bed machines are the entry-level size for stationary jointers and, as the smallest...

  • 2010 Editor's Choice: Husqvarna Autotune Chain Saw

    Husqvarna's latest innovation makes the operation and maintenance of its two-stroke engines a new game and raises the bar for high-performance chain saws.

  • TOOLS of the TRADEshow-STAFDA 2009 Edition

    Last week I attended the 33rd annual STAFDA convention and trade show in Atlanta, Georgia. Membership includes distributors, retailers, and manufacturers of light construction tools and related products. This show is always interesting for Tools of the Trade because it is where we find the latest...

  • Torque Standards Stall

    Editor's note: On three separate occasions since July 2006, Tools of the Trade reported on the progress of an industry effort to create new universal power-tool measurement procedures. In January 2008, the Power Tool Institute announced the development and adoption of new voluntary procedures by...

  • Jet 708315BTC Benchtop Table Saw

    I bought the Jet 708315BTC because I wanted to supplement my regular job-site table saw with a portable model.

  • Contractor Table Saws

  • Portable 10-Inch Table Saws

  • 3-HP Shapers

    Nothing says 'custom' like having a 450-pound shaper stationed on your shop floor. You could try to pull off radius work, trim profiles, raised panels, and fancy mantels without one, but it wouldn't be easy. And it wouldn't come out nearly as well.

  • Metal-Cutting Circ Saws

    You can't flip open a window in a skyscraper, so we usually end up working in enclosed spaces where using cut-off saws with abrasive wheels will fill the air with acrid smoke and airborne filings. And if that's not bad enough, hogging through a bundle of metal studs in a closed room is...