More stories about Ridgid

  • Full-Size Oscillating Multi-Tools

    Look for a powerful model that offers quick blade changes and is easy to grip in any position

  • Tool Test: 18-Volt Drill/Drivers

    Today's cordless drills are significantly better than the ones I used four or five years ago — they have more power and greater runtime, and take less time to charge. Many of them are lighter, too. The most obvious change has been the move from nicad to lithium-ion batteries, with lithium-ion...

  • Family Tree: Rigid/AEG

    AEG's power tools look a lot like Ridgid's – as well they should, since AEG is owned by TTI.

  • Tool Test: Demo-Blade Showdown

    We pushed 18 recip-saw blades to their limits to determine their ability to cut quickly and resist wear.

  • Tool Test: 18-Volt Lithium-Ion Impact Drivers

    For this article my crew and I tested 18 lithium-ion impact-driver kits. Some companies sell the same tool in two kits – each with different batteries – and in such cases we tested both versions. We used all the drivers for several months, trading them around so that everybody had experience with...

  • Tool Test: Subcompact Drill/Drivers and Impact Drivers

    Subcompact tools are the fastest growing segment of the cordless market. The number of available models has grown from a mere handful four years ago to more than 100 today. The tools in this category are defined by their small size, light weight, and 10.8-volt lithium-ion battery packs (which for...

  • Product Watch: Dual-Blade Saw

    Because they have a pair of close-set blades spinning in opposing directions, dual-blade saws virtually eliminate kickback and are great for plunge-cutting.

  • Tool Test: Inline Circular Saws

    Fifteen years ago, when I started out as a framer, Skil was the only real choice for carpenters looking for an inline saw. Since then, a lot more companies have started making these tools and now there are quite a few to choose from.

  • Spring 2011 Product Watch

  • Tools Up Close: Job-Site Radios

    Like many carpenters, I enjoy listening to music at work. When I was starting out, there were only a couple of options: Leave the truck radio on with the door open (and risk having to jump the battery later on) or listen to a bad-sounding boombox that was held together with duct tape and had a wire...