More stories about Home-Made and Modified Tools

  • A Simple But Effective Ripping Jig

    For those of you who can't afford a plunge cutting saw and guide rail, here's an inexpensive home-made jig that does much the same thing.

  • Combination Jab Saw/Utility Knife

    I've been testing tools for years and am on a lot of mailing lists, so new tools frequently arrive on my doorstep unannounced. Most of these tools end up gathering dust in my shop but a recent arrival from the Swanson Tool Company has earned a coveted spot in my tool belt...

  • Four Over-the-Top Shops

    Here are four of the most remarkable shops I saw this year on YouTube. Screen shots cannot do them justice, so be sure to view them online.

  • Can't Get it Yet: Circular Circ Saw

    We’ve all seen concept cars – bizarre designs that are displayed at auto shows but never go into production. Well here’s the world’s first concept cordless circular saw and it’s radical.

  • The Ultimate Home-Made Table Saw

    Hector Acevedo is an excellent mechanic and craftsman. How do I know? Because I have seen photos and drawings of the cabinet saw he built from hardwood, plywood, and a mixture of home-made and purchased parts.

  • Home-Made Vertical Panel Saw

    This picture of a home-made vertical panel saw was posted on one of the WoodWeb forums. As its maker puts it, 'it's not much to look at but it works very well.'

  • An Extremely Impractical Tool

    The maker of this knife admits that it is enormous and impractical – but will sell it to you anyway.

  • Repurposing a Lock Mortiser

    Last summer I built a set of craftsman style carriage doors for my house and decided to use mortise and tenon joints. I hadn't made this kind of joint before so I asked my friend, Gary Katz, how to go about cutting the deep mortises. He suggested using a lock mortising machine, a tool designed for...

  • What's up with Canadian Woodworkers?

    And I mean that in a good way. I keep running across incredible inventions by Canadian woodworkers and it makes me wonder if there's something in the water up there or if maybe they get snowed in and spend all winter in the shop.

  • Sitelines: War Stories

    We go to work every day worrying about the weather or wondering if our crews and supplies will show up on time so we can stay on schedule with our progress and our profits. We love to brag about how hard we work and complain about the tough conditions we face on our job sites – and then brag again...