The standard Pop-Up Driver holds 12 bits in the handle; the selection of bits varies by model.
David Frane The standard Pop-Up Driver holds 12 bits in the handle; the selection of bits varies by model.
This is the insulated Pop-Up Driver with the storage compartment closed.
David Frane This is the insulated Pop-Up Driver with the storage compartment closed.
To open the compartment, squeeze the buttons on the handle and the end cap pops up, revealing the stored bits.
David Frane To open the compartment, squeeze the buttons on the handle and the end cap pops up, revealing the stored bits.
The insulated model holds 7 bits in its compartment. The tool is packaged in multiple configuration so there is some choice in the selection of bits.
David Frane The insulated model holds 7 bits in its compartment. The tool is packaged in multiple configuration so there is some choice in the selection of bits.

Wiha, a German company that specializes in hand tools, had a couple of the more interesting products I saw this year's STAFDA show, Pop-Up drivers. As with other multi-bit drivers, their extra bits store in the handle. But instead of accessing bits by pushing them out (as with Milwaukee’s multi-bit driver), you squeeze a pair of buttons at the far end of the handle and a holder pops out from the end (videos below). You can remove the bit you want and then push the holder back into the handle—where it will remain until you push the buttons again.

There are two versions of the tool, insulated and non-insulated—both with cushioned handles. The insulated model is rated to 1,000 volts and contains 7 assorted bits an electrician might use. It’s packaged with various combinations of Phillips, square, and Phillips terminal bits. The non-insulated model holds 12 short bits. It too is packaged with various combinations of bits: slotted, Phillips, Torx, and hex.

Both Pop-Up tools are made in Germany. The street price is $70 for insulated models and $27 for non-insulated models.