Husqvarna’s new DC1400 is designed for the rigors demanded by fine dust and can be maneuvered like a handtruck.

When compared with traditional shop or utility vacuums used mainly for cleanup duties, vacuums used primarily for collecting dust have a few major differences. Hoses for dust collection are smaller in diameter. This prevents them from being able to gobble up large chunks like cleanup vacs can, but the thinner hose creates higher velocity airflow, which is ideal for capturing dust. Fine-dust collection (and containment) also requires vacs to use higher efficiency filters and seals than those of most utility vacs. Dust-collection vacs built for the rigors of the concrete jobsite have some kind of self-cleaning feature that operates at a regular interval to keep the filters from clogging and causing a loss of suction.

A drain hose in the back allows you to drain liquid without lifting or tipping the vac.
Credit: Rear Port

A drain hose in the back allows you to drain liquid without lifting or tipping the vac.

Similar to most utility vacs, these dust extractors can also be used for water and slurry pickup, which is useful for wet grinding, polishing, and coring operations.

An on-board tool activation switch enables starting the machine via a connected tool.
Credit: tool power

An on-board tool activation switch enables starting the machine via a connected tool.

The Husqvarna DC1400 vac has a maximum tank capacity of 14 gallons dry when used without a filter bag, and 10 1/2 gallons wet. When the vac reaches its wet capacity, internal electrodes sense the water level and turn the unit off. And for draining liquid contents without lifting or tipping the vac, there is a drain hose at the back. Generously sized casters and a tall handle make it easy to steer the 37.5-pound vac around the jobsite. To clear hoses and curbs, just tilt the whole thing back onto its rear wheels to roll it around like a hand truck. The vac moves air at 123 cfm, develops suction of 89 inches of water lift, and runs at a quiet 67 decibels.

Cost: $1150 (found online)