Frederick McCarthy

If you don’t like wearing gloves on the job, you're not the only one, but bare-handers beware. Unsurprisingly, hand injuries are more common among workers who don't wear gloves.

Nearly 140,000 hand injuries were occurred in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. As recently as 2003, a study published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine found that workers who experienced hand injuries reportedly wore gloves only 27% of their work time, and only 19% were wearing gloves at the time of injury. The report concluded that by wearing gloves, workers could reduce the relative risk of hand injury by about 60%.

You could opt for a tear-away wedding ring to lessen your changes of damaging finger injuries, but better yet, give your hands full-coverage protection with new additions to StoneBreaker's Trades Line of gloves. MasterSmith and Demo styles join NailBender gloves for a full range of hand protection.

Frederick McCarthy

The MasterSmith design (above) features multiple areas of reinforced padding and added leather patches. The back has a breathable two-way stretch spandex area, which provides a "snap back" effect after you put it on, and ultimately allows the glove to hold up better in day-to-day wear. The shell comprises 22 separate pieces so the leather conforms to the hand and won’t bunch up at the palm. A hex nut grommet and enhanced strap help ensure a secure fit.

For rougher projects, the Demo glove is the most specialized and toughest of the Trades Line. It features two layers of split cowhide shell to provide extra protection against sharp edges that come exposed during demolition. Seamless, shock-absorbing padding offers added comfort, while reinforcing leather patches to provide extra protection.

All Trades Line gloves feature double-stitched seams for durability, and high-quality leathers and synthetics for longer glove life and more comfort. "Fit to Work" construction for a snug fit that improves dexterity, holds its shape, and won't require a break-in period. All of this adds up to gloves that workers are more likely to wear.