Brick

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Bosch Mortar Knife

This rotary hammer bit is designed to quickly remove mortar from vertical joints... More

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Product Watch: Rebar-Resistant Masonry Bit

Nothing destroys masonry bits like rebar. One solution may be the new SpeedHammer... More

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A Full Day's Work in One Hour

Ray Robinson, Spec Mix Bricklayer 500 winner More

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Tramex MRH III Moisture Meter

Tramex's MRH III noninvasive moisture meter measures the moisture content of most... More

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Arcus Contoured Masonry Blade

Thanks to its unique saucerlike shape, the 7-inch Contoured Masonry Blade by Arcus... More

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Hot Finds: Simple Man Products Spyder Scraper

The Spyder Scraper from Simple Man Products is about as basic as a tool gets. More

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Product Watch: Marshalltown DURAdjust Brick Trowel

Marshalltown's new DURAdjust brick trowel has a dial that lets the user adjust the... More

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Barrett Diamond Products Tilebit-Pro System

Few things are more frustrating than trying to drill through porcelain tile with... More

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Mark Orwig and Dennis Smith

Necessity is the mother of invention–and tool hounds. Say you've got to cut curves into some huge oak timbers that weigh 400 lbs. apiece. Your bandsaw is out–or is it? Not if you're Mark Orwig and Dennis Smith. The two master carpenters loaded their bandsaw onto a dolly and moved the saw–not the beams–to shape them for a large Tudor house they built. More

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Cut-Off Sawseaxyawrztaccvtaxfraexavutudzyvawd

Long before I became a builder, I used gasoline-powered portable cut-off saws in the Air Force for crash and rescue recovery work to cut through automobile and airplane wreckage and buildings. I left the Air Force long ago, but not the saws. Now I build homes in Santa Fe, N.M., and work with as much adobe, concrete, stucco, and re-bar as I-joists and OSB. My Air Force experience gave me a real appreciation for these tools, so anytime I have to cut concrete, masonry, or steel I reach for one. It also showed me that nobody in their right mind would look forward to using them?they're loud, expensive, and incredibly messy, whether wet cutting or dry. But when it comes to cutting tough materials, they're also the best tools for the job. More

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Tool Tests

Occidental Leather Framer Set Toolbelt

Carpenter and former editor Mark Clement takes a look at Occidental’s...

Makita Rear-Handle Cordless Circular Saw

On the West Coast, rear-handle worm drives rule. Does this cordless version with a...

Tool Test: Hitachi Triple Hammer Impact Driver

Did adding a third anvil increase driving speed, beats per minute, and torque, all...

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