Eli Meir Kaplan/Wonderful Machine for Remodeling 

Mark Scott, CEO of Mark Scott IV Builders, poses for a portrait in a house being remodeled on Monday, January 11, 2016 in Washington, DC.
Eli Meir Kaplan Eli Meir Kaplan/Wonderful Machine for Remodeling Mark Scott, CEO of Mark Scott IV Builders, poses for a portrait in a house being remodeled on Monday, January 11, 2016 in Washington, DC.

New rules involving silica dust and eye protection top the list of changes on the horizon.

Remodeling magazine recently reported that the Obama administration is scheduled to add four new OSHA rules in 2016. In addition to the new changes, OSHA is expected to change how its inspectors prioritize the violations that they investigate.

We’ve reported on OSHA’s proposed change for airborne crystalline silica dust, which will likely require N95 NIOSH-certified respirator be worn on every worker mixing concrete; jack hammering; rock, concrete, and masonry drilling, and sawing. The rule change will likely impact remodeling contractors and drywall contractors working with drywall dust as well.

In addition to more stringent standards involving silica dust, OSHA is working on new Walking Working Surfaces and Personal Fall Protection Systems standards. The new standard was expected in the spring of 2016, but has been pushed back until the end of 2016.

Beginning in March 2016, OSHA is expected to publish its final rule on Workplace Injury and Illness Tracking. The new rule will require companies with 10 or more employees (currently set at 20 or more) to electronically submit an OSHA 300A summary of injuries once a year. Companies with 250 employees or more will have to submit electronic versions of their logs quarterly.

Lastly, OSHA is revising its Eye and Face Protection standards to reflect ANSI’s current testing and minimum thickness requirements for protective eyewear. This rule is likely to be published in late spring. Read More